Saturday, November 14, 2015

Revolutionary Heroes and Heroines: Integrating Art


Hi, this is Brandi from The Research Based Classroom. I'm sure your day is just as packed as mine is. There's so much to teach and so little time to teach. That's why anything that can be integrated just makes sense. I have to admit that integrating has actually been a little more difficult for me this year. Maybe integration in education is a higher level planning skill. Right now I am so focused on what I have to teach, that I'm not spending enough time on how I can teach it. But I was forced into thinking about this a little more this past week. Our district visual arts specialist was coming around to observe an integrated art lesson. As a grade level team we had already come up with some ideas for integrating the arts into our curriculum, but none of those ideas fit into what I'm teaching right now. So I started trying to find something that would. I'm pretty much on the road to rebellion in social studies and I just bought this really great book. I have been really excited about this book and it hit me while I thumbing through it the other day that we could do something with portraits and quotes from the Revolutionary War figures we were learning about.

Click on the book cover to go to Amazon.

Once I had decided on portraits for the art lesson, I went looking for some tutorials on drawing portraits. I was thinking that some face proportion help was what I needed, But then I found this portrait lesson on Deep Space Sparkle. I loved the way her student's Modigliani inspired portraits came out. So I decided to try oil pastel portraits of Revolutionary War heroes and heroines. I created a PowerPoint to help us get started. On the first page I put a handful of Modigliani portraits that we looked at together and started creating a list of characteristics of his work. Then we picked a hero or heroine from the Revolutionary War to draw. Everyone had a picture of the person they chose and we went to work. We drew with black oil pastels on black construction paper. After we finished coloring in everything, we went back and traced over all of the black lines once again to make everything stand out. I absolutely love how these came out.


Right now the pictures are all hanging in the hallway and my students have made name tags for each one. My next stop on this road to rebellion will be adding short biographies telling about the extraordinary things each of these heroes and heroines did during the war and maybe we will even add some quotes among the artwork. 





3 comments:

  1. Those pictures look amazing! They could be picture book illustrations. What a fun idea!

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  2. The artwork is GORGEOUS! LOVE this. Thank you for sharing!

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  3. These are amazing pictures! Love how you were integrate. I have to agree that it can be hard to do, but the end result is often worthwhile. Thank you for taking the time to link up on my Teaching Tuesday linky party. I'm sharing this on Pinterest. I hope to see you back again next week!
    ~Heather aka HoJo~

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